My Blog

Posts for: January, 2019

By All About Children Pediatrics
January 17, 2019
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: newborn care   Newborn  

There is a lot of care and work that goes into raising a newborn, and your pediatrician is here to help right from the beginning. Your pediatrician typically sees your newborn for their very first appointment within a few days of being discharged from the hospital. Your pediatrician is here for you to ask any questions or address any concerns you may have about your newborn and caring for your newborn. Some of the topics that your pediatrician may discuss in that first visit are:

Feeding- Your pediatrician will watch your baby’s feeding habits during this period and make sure that their growth is right on schedule. During the first six months of your newborn’s life, you’ll feed them formula or breastmilk. Breastfed babies tend to eat more frequently than babies who are fed formula.

Sleep- Every baby has different sleep schedules and needs. Most newborns tend to sleep sixteen to seventeen hours a day, but only sleep a few hours at a time. Sleep cycles don’t tend to normalize until your baby is about six months old. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that healthy infants should sleep on their backs until they are able to roll over on their own.

Bathing- Infants do not usually require daily bathing, as long as the diaper area is thoroughly cleaned during changes, because daily bathing dry out their skin. Instead, it’s recommended to sponge bathe areas as needed.

Umbilical Cord Care- An infant’s umbilical cord should eventually dry up and fall off on its own by the time your baby is two weeks old. Until then, make sure to keep the area clean and dry by using sponge baths instead of submerging your baby in the tub. Small drops of blood are normal around the time that the umbilical cord is supposed to fall off. If you notice any active bleeding, foul-smelling yellowish discharge, or red skin around the stump, contact your pediatrician.

Your newborn should see their pediatrician at 2 weeks, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 9 months, 12 months, and regularly throughout their life. Call your pediatrician for any questions on newborn care today!


By All About Children Pediatrics
January 16, 2019
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Asthma  

Your child's chronic cough may actually be a symptom of asthma. The lung disease affects 8 percent of people under 18, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Asthma treatments offered by the pediatricians at All About Children Pediatrics in Eden Prairie, MN, can help your child breathe easier.

Does my child have asthma?

Asthma affects the small airways in the lungs, causing swelling and excess mucus production that make breathing difficult. Although your child may struggle to breathe if he or she has severe asthma, symptoms may be more subtle in milder cases. Common symptoms of asthma include:

  • Coughing: Does your child cough often even though he or she doesn't have a cold or an upper respiratory virus? Asthma may be to blame. You may notice that coughing worsens after your child is active.
  • Tightness in the Chest: Kids with asthma may complain that their chests hurt or feel tight or strange.
  • Shortness of Breath and Wheezing: Both shortness of breath and wheezing can occur if your son or daughter has asthma. Wheezing sounds like a whistling or rattling sound and tends to occur when your child breathes out.
  • Trouble Sleeping: It's difficult to get a good night's sleep if you can't stop coughing or have trouble breathing. Lack of sleep can lead to daytime fatigue and irritability and may even affect your child's performance at school.

How is asthma treated?

Your child's Eden Prairie pediatrician will recommend treatments aimed at keeping symptoms under control. Inhaled and oral medications are generally used to treat asthma. These medications reduce inflammation, open airways and relax the muscles surrounding the airways.

Allergy testing may be suggested, as allergies can trigger asthma symptoms. If your child does have allergies, allergy medication or immunotherapy may help decrease asthma flare-ups. Your child's doctor can also provide a few tips that will help your son or daughter breathe easier at home, such as using a HEPA filter to remove airborne allergens, banning smoke and strong-smelling products in your house, replacing feather pillows with foam, or vacuuming often to get rid of dust and allergens.

Does your child have any of these asthma symptoms? Call your child's Eden Prairie, MN, pediatricians and certified pediatric nurse practitioners at All About Children Pediatrics at (952) 943-8200 to schedule an appointment.


By All About Children Pediatrics
January 10, 2019
Category: Child Health
Tags: Vision   Sight  

Does Your Child Have Vision Problems?



Does your child have vision problems? Children learn through their eyes. Healthy vision is critical for children to see the computer and chalkboard, read, write, and even play. Children's eyes should be examined regularly, as many eye conditions and vision problems can be detected and treated early. Here are six signs that your child may have a vision problem.

1. Squinting eyes. If your child is nearsighted then squinting his eyes helps him make his vision a little clearer and can clear up any distorted vision. Nearsighted just means that they can see things that are near them but have a harder time with objects that are far away. Squinting is a coping mechanism to help relieve their blurry vision.

2. Sitting close to the TV. While it's a myth that sitting close to the television will damage your eyes, this habit may be a sign of a vision problem. If your child can't see televised images clearly or always holds a book too close, it could mean she or he is nearsighted.

3. Frequent eye rubbing. Yes, kids often rub their eyes when they're upset or tired. But if your child rubs her eyes while she's trying to concentrate on something, or while she is being active, it could mean that she has a vision problem. Frequently rubbing their eyes can be a sign of eye strain in children. It can be a sign of a focusing issue that causes the eyes to tire easily.

4. Losing place while reading. When children learn to read and are sounding out words, they will frequently use their finger to track which word they're on. But eventually children should be able to focus without losing their place. If after a while your child still uses his finger, ask him to try reading without pointing. If he has trouble, he may have a vision problem.

5. Sensitivity to light. Are your child's eyes sensitive to sunshine or indoor lighting? Many common eye conditions can make people more sensitive to light. If your child's light sensitivity is caused by an eye condition, then treatment for their condition can mean that his eye becomes less light sensitive.

6. Receiving lower grades. If your child is having a hard time seeing what her teacher writes on the board because of poor vision, she may not tell you about it. As a result, her grades can suffer. Most of what kids learn in schools is taught visually. That means if your child has an untreated vision problem, it could affect his or her development.

Yearly eye exams are as important as visits to the pediatrician. If you think your child may have a vision problem, schedule an appointment with a doctor. Early detection and treatment provide the best opportunity to correct a vision problem so your child can learn to see clearly.